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The Sound I felt ~ RiffShot of a Jazz Portrait of Monk Who Demonstrated the Bliss of Being Who He Truly Was…featuring Thelonious Monk – Epistrophy

American Jazz Pianist Thelonious Monk on TIME MAGAZINE Cover
American Jazz Pianist Thelonious Monk on TIME MAGAZINE Cover

“If you follow your bliss, you put yourself on a kind of track that has been there all the while, waiting for you, and the life that you ought to be living is the one you are living. Wherever you are — if you are following your bliss, you are enjoying that refreshment, that life within you, all the time.”  Joseph Campbell

Jazz dropped a distinctive musical expression into American culture at the turn of the 20th Century.  The presence of jazz became expansive, universal, and prolific. It became the most influential approach to music for all time.  Jazz blends diverse contexts by capturing sounds and rhythms transforming them into spontaneous and synchronistic styles that infuse harmonic manipulations and maelstrom rhythms that are featured in solo and group performances.  Jazz is an acoustic metaphor of life’s challenges or riffs.  Our emotions  love, fear, anger, sorrow and joy create a canvas upon which we live.  Life’s challenges (riffs) are:  abandonment, arrogance, inferiority, rejection and shame.  Personal transformation allows us to overcome these riffs.  Jazz is a way of dealing with life’s challenges especially through featured solo performances.  The formula for a good life is harmony; being able to maintain and live truthfully; showing up and sharing a sense of well-being and interconnectedness with others.  Finally having faith and trusting that these riffs are merely a part of living.  My biggest riff has always been abandonment beginning when I was just a little chick.  It filled the spectrum of being alone, judged and dependent upon everything and one outside of me.  Jazz taught me what being in the world and not of it truly means.  Joseph Campbell wrote: “The privilege of a lifetime is to be who you are”.  Growing up in a jazz filled environment enabled me to see life from a different perspective.  I initially saw and felt it when dad was composing and arranging songs.  I also witnessed it at rehearsals and live performances on stage.  I discovered that I experienced it when I am reading and writing prose and making collages.  I had to keep it as a secret because the fear that dad would abandon me became overwhelming.  It took many years for me to develop the courage to be me.

So now let’s take a closer look at jazz as an acoustic metaphor of life.  The jazz ensemble/orchestra is an acoustic canvas of what I would describe as the ‘good life’. The difference between an ensemble and a classical symphony orchestra is that jazz ensemble/orchestras feature a solo performance that imparts their own style of imagination and creativity and still maintains the harmonic integrity and rhythm of the original melody.   Through receptive sensitivity the soloist features their self-expressive performances to the audience. The complex harmony is only possible through playing from a collective score that inspires free musical expression and interacting with one another.  The musicians are playing without obstacles or conflict creating a sense of harmony and free style that benefits the greater good of the whole.  There is a sense of self-actualization through a loss of self in the song. The achievement in this case, the song, acts as an internal and interactive transformation between the musicians and the audience.

Jazz Portrait of Thelonious Monk

Monk had a unique improvisational style and made numerous contributions to the standard jazz repertoire, including “Epistrophy“, “‘Round Midnight“, “Blue Monk”, “Straight, No Chaser” and “Well, You Needn’t“. Monk is the second-most recorded jazz composer wrote about 70. His compositions and improvisations are full of dissonant harmonies and angular melodic twists, and are consistent with Monk’s unorthodox approach to the piano, which combined a highly percussive attack with abrupt, dramatic use of silences and hesitations. Since this was not a style universally appreciated poet and jazz critic Philip Larkin dismissed Monk as ‘the elephant on the keyboard’. Monk’s manner was idiosyncratic. Visually, he was renowned for his distinctive style in suits, hats and sunglasses. At times, Monk while the other musicians in the band continued playing, would stop, stand up from the keyboard and dance for a few moments before returning to the piano. Notably, Monk was one of five jazz musicians to have been featured on the cover of Time.

David Thomson from the Los Angeles Times proclaimed Geoff Dyer. who wrote “But Beautiful:  A Book About JazzMay be the best book ever written about jazz”,  wrote a passage on Monk that I must say gave me a little insight into what it was like living with my father and living in the jazz world.  But like jazz, it speaks more about the man as an individual, their idiosyncrasies, their uniqueness.  Here is an excerpt from his book that gives a good example of Monk.  Mr. Dyer wrote:

“He kept all his music very close to him, didn’t like other people seeing it, he kept everything close to him.  When he went out he liked to be wrapped up in a coat—winter was his time—and he preferred not to stray too far.  At the studio he’d have his music in a little book, reluctant to let other people see it….”

Here is a video of Monk performing “Epistrophy” so you can get a feel for his portrait.

This is one example of jazz as metaphor and the meaning of the ‘good life’ where the privilege of a lifetime is indeed to be who you are. How about you!  What shade is your life? How do you express yourself?  As always, I promise to give more…Peace & Love Out!  JBC 😎 & >3

live laugh and love

© Copyright  2011-2015 by Jazzybeatchick/JazZenista/Jannat Marie. All rights reserved.

This material is has been copyrighted,  feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks and added to websites; please do not change the content, provide credit by including the author’s name @ http://jazzybeatchick.com and your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

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Yin and Yang (or, How We Resonate)

For Free Write Friday, Here is a beautiful way of expressing Jazz in terms of conversation with each other and living in  a harmonious world! Beautifully written by Rachel Mankowitz Freshly Pressed…Peace Out! 😎 & ❤

 

rachelmankowitz

 

Some people resonate with each other, not because they are objectively the same but because they complement each other in interesting ways. We often talk about yin and yang, where two people create a whole circle, but I tend to think more of melody and harmony. It’s not a circle with no holes, it’s a song that resonates and echoes.

Cricket and Butterfly are not a perfect match. First of all, they look too much alike. They have the same color hair, both white with apricot markings in mostly the same places. And they both bark, at different pitches, but not in a harmony of beautiful sound; they are not a choir, they are a cacophony of noise. They are not the same height, but also not opposites, like big and small or fat and skinny. They are just small and smaller. They don’t fill all of the possible…

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Tell it Slant Tuesday ~ Prologue Knowing the Real You featuring Keiko Matsui – Voice Of The Heart Special short The Real You – Alan Watts

tell it slant tuesday

     plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose. | The more things change, the more they stay the same.

Jazz has taught me ~ Faith in my writing opens my mind to all of life’s possibilities.  My writing is my instrument.  It means everything to me.  It’s how I feel, how I express myself, how I communicate.  As writers we use every aspect of words and sounds seeking perfection.  That’s what keeps us going.  Knowing that you’ll never get there; it is something to strive for every moment of the day.

 

I practice with a blank page every day.  When I start with my morning free write meditation I realize that I bring in thoughts outside of who I am and from other things.  Reflection allows you to begin the process and to bask in the present tense.  You find the rhythm in your breath and  allow a stream of words and ideas to flow.  It is a very meditative process.  Writing and collage art are definitely my spiritual gifts and paths.  When I remember my upbringing Jazz became the portal that connected me to the world I live in and saved and healed me to where my life was heading.   I lived in disguise as a child.  There was something about reading and discovering the power of words and sound that was instinctive and natural to me.  It gave me strength.  It gave me a voice.  I think that everything that I represent when people look at me demonstrates that I am a writer to the core.  I started secretly writing when I was nine years old which by all standards is far too obscure for a daughter of a renowned jazz arranger and of mixed race to be seen as a successful writer in the literary and jazz world.  I am well read and educated and although I wrote I never entered contests or attempted to publish which now I feel has worked against me.  I think I have broken some myths about how people think about Jazz in my blog posts.  The greatest lesson I’ve learned is to be vulnerable and to believe in myself.  Being socially defined and proscribed as a minority in the ‘60’s and have the pressures of the literary world can sometimes be overwhelming and a lot to handle.  Writing and Jazz helped me to understand why I am here and why my purpose is to lean into my fears and opportunities to write no matter what the circumstances or rejections.  I will always be grateful for it.  I just think that is what I was born to do….Check out Alan WattsThe Real You.

Do you know who you are?  Peace and Love Out!  JBC 😎 & >3

© Copyright  2011-2014 by Jazzybeatchick/JazZenista/Jannat Marie. All rights reserved.

This material is has been copyrighted,  feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks and added to websites; please do not change the content, provide credit by including the author’s name @ http://jazzybeatchick.com and your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

 

WordPlay Wednesday ~ Jazz Language and Why we need to Create to Make the World a Better Place ~Featuring ASCAP 100

wordplayIII

Life isn’t about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself.” ~ George Bernard Shaw

 

As a appetizer and a pre-Thanksgiving football, food lodging gift I give you  Jason Silva’s  “Existential Bummer”.

It has been proven that learning a different language or learning to play music like jazz has a ton of benefits when it comes to health and cognitive abilities.  According to a study that was conducted at the University of Washington, Seattle WA found that bilinguals can process information more quickly than their monolingual counterparts.  Additionally, did you know that musicians like bilinguals are better at arithmetic, because it developes the mind and conditions it to see and experience different perspectives, versatility and possibilities.  FYI the  Basal ganglia is the part of the brain that processes and interprets information before it is integrated into speaking, thinking ~ our cognitive skills aka our inner genius.  So learn French or Japanese or learn to play an instrument and check out jazz where after you master the basics you can improvise and expand your ability of self expression.

 

ASCAP 100: Why We Create Music [Film] – Collaborative Score – Ne-Yo Lady Antebellum Aloe Blacc

Published on Nov 22, 2013

ASCAP hit its 100-year milestone on February 13th, 2014. For an entire century, the leading US performing rights organization has made it possible for American songwriters, composers and music publishers, who create the music the world loves, to thrive alongside the businesses that use their work. The ASCAP site features an interactive timeline of ASCAP’s rich history and additional interviews with each of the 15 ASCAP members featured in this film.

ASCAP’s commissioned short film “Why We Create Music” celebrates the organization’s 100-year history by providing a behind-the-scenes look into the creative process of a veritable who’s-who of today’s top songwriters and composers. Combining footage from more than 10 separate film shoots around the country with 15 ASCAP members, the film explores the meaning and power of music as expressed by the music creators themselves. In addition, from shoot to shoot an unprecedented collaborative musical composition was built as each participant added their own musical “voice” to the score. A companion song, “More Than The Stars,” which will also have a music video and features lyrics by Ne-Yo, Lady Antebellum’s Charles Kelley and Dave Haywood, Dan Wilson and Claudia Brant, will be released soon. A preview of “More Than The Stars” can be heard in the end credits of the “Why We Create Music” film.

Happy Thanksgiving!  Love and Peace Out!  JBC 😎 & ❤

© Copyright  2011-2014 by Jazzybeatchick/JazZenista/Jannat Marie. All rights reserved.

This material is has been copyrighted,  feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks and added to websites; please do not change the content, provide credit by including the author’s name @ http://jazzybeatchick.com and your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

Word Play Wednesday ~ Saved by Herbie Hancock’s “Imagine” through My Mom’s Death from and My Choice to Live with Breast Cancer Riff

My Breast Cancer Journey ~ The sea of life  2011
My Breast Cancer Journey ~ The sea of life 2011

It is the way you play that makes it…Play like you play, play like you think, and you got it, if you are going to get it.  And whatever you get, that’s you, so that’s your story.”  ~ Count Basie 

There are three days left to Breast Cancer Month and I wanted to end them with something with an upbeat rather than the downbeat that sometimes takes over the days.  Count Basie said those words to me in the fall of 1967 at the Newport Jazz Festival.  It was when dad took me to Monterey Jazz Festival Orchestra’s rehearsal and the Count was onstage sitting at the piano and he motioned to me to come sit next to him on the bench.  I shot a look at dad he looked at me smiling Go on, he’s family!  At that very moment at the tender age of thirteen thinking I am absolute existence, I am a meadow of all that is possible  Jazz is collaboration of individual souls connecting to a universal riff transcending all limitations awakening everyone present to self discovery and expression in the majesty of God’s gift to our lives. In 2000 it saved my life.  Why? Because my mom and I did not have any choice back in 1997, when our Breast Cancer journey began and was not commonplace back then.  Our Oncologist a Harvard Medical School doctor was making strides to treat the  disease.  We were collateral damage.  He proscribed medications that gave me horrifying dreams of my mother and I being decapitated in a collision with a 18 wheeler mac truck.  When I told him about the dreams and the lack of sleep his response was That’s psychological, I can give you adavan.  That did not work.  I was desperately to reconnect with my soul.  What had been sacred to me changed and I wanted to make peace with my cancer and use it to give up the notion of what no longer worked for me and find new ways to get close to what is sacred in my life.  I would go for chemotherapy and would play Coltrane, Miles, the Count and Ella, Sarah and of course my dad’s music.  Mark Singer in The Untethered Soul” taught me to allow the cancer and loss not to fight it but to embrace and accept things as they are.  I created a conversation remembering that Fall day back in 1967 with Count Basie and it brought me back to an aliveness surrendering my fears to find a new current and flowing with life at that moment.  My friends faded away because they didn’t know what to say to me.  I can’t tell you the number of times I wanted to give up.  I began to listen to Coltrane’s Serenity and became completely present.  The transformational power of letting go of my identity of being a cancer patient dissolved away.

Uploaded on Aug 26, 2010

Herbie Hancock’s The Imagine Project. Song: Imagine, featuring Pink, Seal, India Arie.

Here are a few brief steps I took:

Seek solitude:   Take a deep breath and allow yourself some time and space to step away from the expectations; the conversations; the pressures and the noise of everyday life.   Focus on your life in that moment. Strive for feeling free, independent and self-sufficient, gently let go thoughts of loneliness, worries or fear.

Seek out and find your passion:  When you believe or see beauty in something, you should follow your heart no matter what anyone else thinks or says. If you have found something that is worthy of your focus, sacrifice, and efforts, you have discovered a passion of your life.  Poetry in the ambience of Jazz did it for me!

Seek more Information:  Identify through reading and searches on the internet to find someone who is doing the exact passion you want to do.  Find out how they did it and how you can create and manifest it in your life.

Seek support :   Finding friends that are supportive and who encourage you when you need it most are key to my journey.  I lost my mom, but, Ida, and Andrea, Greg, Gerry, Cindy, and Dave have taken this journey with me.   A support system is crucial to any personal transformation and healing.  They will understand what you’re going through.

So get to steppin’ to the soul filled beat of your life.  Mark Nepo says it best Poetry is the utterance from the soul… Peace and Love Out!  JBC 😎 ❤

Japanese translation for meaning
Japanese translation for meaning

© Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

Jazzin’ thru Thursdays ~ Jazz Is My Religion by Ted Joans featuring Vitamin Jazz – If I Ever Lose My Faith In You

 

Jazzin' thru Thursday
Jazzin’ thru Thursday

 

Jazz has weathered the storms of racism and chauvinism for over a quarter of a century.  Religion and faith is what help one to survive through the roughest times.  I started reading “Siddhartha” by Hermann Hesse when I as 10 years old, it awakened something in me that showed me that Words, spoken, sung or written and jazz are the loves of my life.  Peace Out!  JBC 8-)!

 

 

Ted Joans (1928-2003), a poet and artist dropped into the scene achieving notoriety as a graffiti artist spray-painting “Bird Lives” on city walls immediately after the death of Charlie Parker in 1955, he spent his entire career writing poems about jazz or that imitated jazz playing. The most popular and well read jazz poem of his is “Jazz is My Religion.” In this brief excerpt, devotion to a pure, non-commercial jazz is seen as a form of piety, the purity of the commitment matching the purity of the art, a common feeling among many jazz fans and musicians of the post-World War II era.

Ted Joans The Word & Jazz Courtesy of weegeeweegeeweegeedotnet
Ted Joans The Word & Jazz Courtesy of weegeeweegeeweegeedotnet

Also emerging at the same time as Joans was Beat poet Bob Kaufman (1925-1986), whose poetry was often improvised on the spot, frequently not written, in much the spirit of the jazz musician.  Free Jazz was emerging and Jazz lead the way in terms the phenomenal women, the Harlem Renaissance and Free Jazz.  Religion and Spirituality has always been at the heart of all Jazz.

Jazz Is My Religion

by Ted Joans

JAZZ is my religion and it alone do I dig the jazz

clubs are my houses of worship and sometimes the concert halls

but some
holy places are too commercial (like churches) so I
don’t dig the
sermons there I buy jazz sides to dig in solitude Like
man/Harlem,
Harlem U.S.A. used used to be a jazz heaven where most of
the jazz
sermons were preached but now-a-days due to chacha
cha and
rotten rock ‘n’roll alotta good jazzmen have sold their
souls but jazz
is still my religion because I know and feel the message
it brings
like reverend Dizzy Gillespie/Brother Bird and
Basie/Uncle
Armstrong/Minister Monk/ Deacon Miles Davis/ Rector
Rollins/
Priest Ellington/ His funkness Horace Silver/ and the great
Pope
John, John COLTRANE and Cecil Taylor They
Preach A Sermon
That Always Swings!!

Yeah jazz is MY religion Jazz
is my story
it was my mom’s and pop’s and their moms and pops
from the days of Buddy Bolton who swung them blues to Charlie
Parker and
Ornette Coleman‘s extension of Bebop Yeah jazz is my
religion
Jazz is unique musical religion the sermons spread
happiness and
joy to be able to dig and swing inside what a
wonderful feeling

jazz is/YEAH BOY!! JAZZ is my religion and dig this:
it wasn’t for
us to choose because they created it for a damn good
reason as a
weapon to battle our blues!JAZZ is my religion and its
international all the way JAZZ is just an Afro-American
music
and like us its here to stay So remember that JAZZ is
my religion
but it can be your religion too but JAZZ is a truth that is
always
black and blue Hallelujah I love JAZZ so Hallelujah I
dig JAZZ so
Yeah JAZZ IS MY RELIGION…….

© Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

Tell It Slant Tuesday~Changing the Jazz Cultural Climate circa 1960’s featuring David Sanborn’s “Rikke”

tell it slant tuesday

 

I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”  Maya Angelou

 

 

NYC Circa 1960
NYC Circa 1960

This is an excerpt from  “Improvising Positions” Chapter in Listening for the Cultural Climate to Change by Jannat Marie…

Since its inception, jazz has suffered a litany of cultural atrocities and was considered lacking in refinement by the upper crust of society in the early 1900’s.  Even when the Jazz Age hit the scene with the Roaring 20’s the Flappers the Establishment or the “Man” felt that women were abandoning their “anointed” role of barefoot and pregnant and in the kitchen.  Then the climate changed again during the Civil Rights Movement.  You could cut the culture rage with a butter knife.  In 1965 I learned from Dad and from the rehearsals in the studio that jazz musicians have a way of dealing with adversity or cultural rage with respect and to listen carefully and pay attention to what is going in and around you for me it was “mindfulness”.  They regarded adversity, i.e. racism, discrimination and even painful feelings with the heart of compassion that …something new will always come out of this experience.  It has a lot to do with Faith.  Culturally speaking, jazz is deeply rooted in spiritually grounded beliefs that resonate in Christianity and Buddhism practices.  It is the belief that we will only grow if we allow ourselves to be vulnerably “raw”.  It relates to just taking whatever is causing us pain in that very moment knowing that it will pass and to hold onto a faith – it will become something new.  It is up to us whether we are going to dwell on it critically or as just an occurring non-judgmental phenomenon that has come into our consciousness.  There is a certain power that jazz musicians have and express when they are playing their instruments. They can hold an audience enraptured by the sound and passion of their performance. Those who study music and devote their lives to its pursuit are all too familiar with this phenomenon.

Blues in Black and White
Blues in Black and White

Perhaps an even greater gift that music gives those who play it is a sense of catharsis and release. Jazz anthropology demonstrates that perspective was how improvisation became a constructive way of coping with difficult times.  It is life steeped in conflicts and has weathered each one in turn, evolving in style as a living, breathing acoustic for of change. The art of jazz improvisational style has progressively helped people stand up and face economic, social, or political issues.  Jazz is freedom! The only limitation that Jazz has is the one that you put upon yourself and the situation.

Black and White Photos of Daily Life In NYC
Black and White Photos of Daily Life In NYC

Jazz made me listen more attentively.  It is the same as developing your sensibilities and heart to listen to the silence between the notes.  Jazz is really a conversation that you would carry on between you and a loved one.  It is that special bond you have with a child.  To a painter it is a blank canvas, a writer a blank page that you create the sound the tempo, the staccato of feelings that brings the page alive with imagination, foresight and love but most of all grace.  It is having faith that no matter what life wants to hurl at us, we meet it with everything we got, the game is on and through our experience and sophistication our response to the call is to lean in to get a closer view as we chant…thank you for the hostility, it has been a real pressure.  But, you can’t stop, steal or hurt me because life has taught me that something new is gonna come outta this experience.  And if you think you are gonna reiterate what you just said, than I am gonna wait till the sun goes down because faith has taught well and I am gonna play my heart out until the sound comes true.  In a flash it is over, gone it the brick and making its way down the highway leaving a trail of scented notes. Some people who have not developed a palate or a repertoire of listening library.  On the surface jazz  sounds foreign and a language that we cannot understand, but as with any art, you have to listen and feel what the artist is trying to say.  It is personal, but in a very good way.  That is why when Maya Angelou so eloquently said, coming from that place where she has lived a rich and meaningful life “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”  That is what is happening to me.  Leaning in and listening to the world around me and hearing music that only makes sense to me and sharing my thoughts and feelings and conversing with the world at large…Peace and Love Out!  JBC -8) & ❤

Japanese translation for meaning

© Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

Jazzin’ Thru Thursday ~Mindfulness, Improv and Jazz: The Wow Factor ~ Oh My! Featuring Ballet Dance Jazz J. Company – Mindfulness Meditation Jazz

 

Jazzin' thru Thursday
Jazzin’ thru Thursday

 

I found out you have to study the culture of the music as well in order to learn jazz.” Regina Carter: Improvising A Life In Jazz

 

jazz improv

 

You know you are immensely creative?  No seriously.  Don’t deny it.  Since you were born, you were given the gift to constantly create your reality.  Some of us engage in it more than others.  Sometimes folks tell you that you are not creative or even you don’t consider yourself a creative type well the truth is that you are constantly creating ideas with every breath that you take.  Jazz can teach us about mutual respect, to nurture our own creativity, spontaneity and how we interact with ourselves and one another and accentuates our innate ability to thrive and build our sustainability skills.

Mindfulness is an invitation to become aware of the constant flow of the universe both inner and exterior and gives us the choice to acknowledge it and either get into the rhythm or to choose to let it flow outside in harmony.   When we become aware of ideas from a sense of serenity at the shore of the ocean or stream you are more likely to develop a different perspective and with that insight will see things in the light of all the commotion that is swirling around us.

 

When mindfulness is combined with jazz’s art of improvisation you become engaged in the process of creating thru words, numbers, music, art, or movement you will never get lost in a concept you actually become a part of the process in its purest form of creativity and enlightenment.  Mindfulness allows us to awaken to the world with childlike wonder and amazement giving us the joy to play with new concepts and seeing and being things from a new perspective.  Judgment and critical thinking is set aside for analysis.  Mindfulness is the ability to let things evolve and not interfere.  It allows you to be patient and know that things are about to happen and not having any expectations of how things will turn out.

The Wow Factor according to Collins dictionary is an informal striking or impressive feature that stimulates us to become creative. Information, trends, media, iPod, iPads, Surface tablets, android or smart phones have invaded our space and taken over our ability to rely on our own devices.  I am so much more connected and happier when I turn those devices off.  Check into a good book, not an e-reader, and watch the television with a big ol’ bowl of my homemade Vegan Ice cream with mangos and pineapple and coconut cream and of course in my p.j.’s.

So let’s get into the Jazz – Just follow what Count Basie said to me at a rehearsal for the Newport Jazz Festival in 1967… “It’s the way you play that makes it . . . Play like you play. Play like you think, and then you got it, if you’re going to get it. And whatever you get, that’s you, so that’s your story.”  We are all story’s waiting to be told.  Mindfulness just gets your head back into the process.   There is fullness in every moment filled with possibilities and is unburdened by our expectations.

It’s easy to make mindfulness improve a part of your life. You already have it!  Just close your eyes and remember those moments when you played until your mom or dad had to pry you away.  Losing all sense of time, space, and everything that was outside of the moment you were fully engaged in.  Just go back.  Don’t think it is silly, maybe it is.  So what!  I know when I got the horrible news that I had breast cancer my mind froze.  Then I felt I was thrown into some vortex of fear, denial, loss, anger, betrayal and the fear surrounding death.  I knew in that precise moment that I had to go back to the times that mom and dad came to the tennis courts at my high school at nine o’clock at night to bring me home because it was dark and I was still hitting those iridescent yellow balls against a junior from Northwestern University who was an alumnus of my high school.  That is what being in the Jazz or in full WOW FACTOR MODE is all aboutAre you ready, then gear up, bring whatever suits your fancy ‘cause man this is gonna be out of sight!  See you there, keep looking for the space between the notes or words or artistic expression.  You will see that you are beyond WOW, You are Amazing!  Peace and Love Out!  JBC 😎 and ❤  It is like an Oreo, it’s Wonder- filled…

Japanese translation for meaning
Japanese translation for meaning

© Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

Free Write Fridays ~ Walking Parker Home by Bob Kaufman featuring Charlie Parker – “Everything Happens To Me”

FreeWrite Friday

 

Music is your own experience, your thoughts, your wisdom. If you don’t live it, it won’t come out of your horn. They teach you there’s a boundary line to music. But, man, there’s no boundary line to art. ∞ Charlie Parker

 

 

It Is Amazing how the secret habit of jazz living ~“mindfulness improv” is the best way to help you become more successful, calmer, happier, more focused and more connected to others—especially to yourself.  Join the IMAnultimatestudent vibe… Let’s kick this weekend off with Charlie “Bird” Parker sounds and Bob Kaufman’s words…  Peace and Love Out!  JBC 😎 & ❤

Walking Parker Home

by Bob Kaufman

Charlie Parker Courtesy of Pintrest
Charlie Parker Courtesy of Pintrest

Sweet beats of jazz impaled on slivers of wind

Kansas Black Morning/ First Horn Eyes/

Historical sound pictures on New Bird wings

People shouts/ boy alto dreams/ Tomorrow’s

Gold belled pipe of stops and future Blues Times

Lurking Hawkins/ shadows of Lester/ realization

Bronze fingers—brain extensions seeking trapped sounds

Ghetto thoughts/ bandstand courage/ solo flight

Nerve-wracked suspicions of newer songs and doubts

New York alter city/ black tears/ secret disciples

Hammer horn pounding soul marks on unswinging gates

Culture gods/ mob sounds/ visions of spikes

Panic excursions to tribal Jazz wombs and transfusions

Heroin nights of birth/ and soaring/ over boppy new ground.

Smothered rage covering pyramids of notes spontaneously exploding

Cool revelations/ shrill hopes/ beauty speared into greedy ears

Birdland nights on bop mountains, windy saxophone revolutions.

Dayrooms of junk/ and melting walls and circling vultures/

Money cancer/ remembered pain/ terror flights/

Death and indestructible existence

 

In that Jazz corner of life

Wrapped in a mist of sound

His legacy, our Jazz-tinted dawn

Wailing his triumphs of oddly begotten dreams

Inviting the nerveless to feel once more

That fierce dying of humans consumed

In raging fires of Love.

Bob Kaufman, “Walking Parker Home” from Solitudes Crowded with Loneliness. Copyright © 1965 by Bob Kaufman. Reprinted by permission of New Directions Publishing Corporation.

 

Japanese translation for meaning
Japanese translation for meaning

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